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Saturday, May 12

  1. page Act 3 (pp. 83-100) edited What are Wikis? Wikis are websites that are easily editable by multiple users. The word "w…

    What are Wikis?
    Wikis are websites that are easily editable by multiple users. The word "wiki" comes from the Hawaiian for "quick", and that's what makes this a feasible technology to integrate into teaching - using wikis is quick, easy, and requires only a web browser and Internet access from the user.
    This short video by Lee LeFever provides an excellent overview of the technology behind wikis:
    Why Should We Use Wikis in School?
    The two key terms to remember with regard to wikis are collaboration and audience. Wikis, while certainly not appropriate for every educational situation, provide a very user-friendly method by which to engender collaboration and draw upon the combined strength of a collective group. Wikis can then be shared with an audience, either very focused or broad. As one of our example wikis states:
    In a sense, PsychWiki is owned by the community, with input from anyone with experience and knowledge to share. Some of the pages are more developed than others, but no page is complete. If you feel like you'd like to add something to a particular page, please do so.
    The implications for not only the classroom but also for personal research and professional development are staggering. Wikis, along with other forms of Internet-based communication, make global collaboration and communication not only possible, but feasible for many.
    Consider the following features of wikis:
    Can be used as bare-bones content management systems (CMSs)
    Free of charge
    User-friendly
    Can be text-only or include embedded video, audio, Flash, HTML, and other add-ons
    Opportunity for students to publish to a global audience & contribute a meaningful product for public consumption
    Allows teachers and other educators to maintain open networks for the benefit of all - promotes collaboration and virtual learning
    Here are some tips & tricks for the novice wiki user:
    Bill Ferriter's Teacher Tips for Wiki Projects
    Cybraryman's catalogue of educational wikis
    Also, please see the case study below by Lyndsay Grant:
    {Using Wikis in Schools.PDF}

    Reason For Choosing Scene
    Our group chose this scene because we thought it was important to the rest of the play and it had the perfect requirements and speaking roles for our group. The scene is the begining of the trial for Elizabeth Proctor and company. John goes to try and free his wife and friends from accusations of witch craft. Since our group has five members we needed an act or scene with multiple speaking characters. The scene we picked had eleven roles which is enough for everyone to have a role. A small reason for choosing this act is there are not a lot of sound effects, so everyone in the group can focus more on the speaking roles and making it sound like a true radio broadcast. In the end we chose this scene because it was important to the rest of the play, had enough speaking roles for everyone, and it had little sound effects so everyone could focus more on making the reading sound like a real broadcast of the play The Crucible.
    (view changes)
    7:19 am
  2. page Act 3 (pp. 83-100) edited What are Wikis? Wikis are websites that are easily editable by multiple users. The word "w…

    What are Wikis?
    Wikis are websites that are easily editable by multiple users. The word "wiki" comes from the Hawaiian for "quick", and that's what makes this a feasible technology to integrate into teaching - using wikis is quick, easy, and requires only a web browser and Internet access from the user.
    This short video by Lee LeFever provides an excellent overview of the technology behind wikis:
    Why Should We Use Wikis in School?
    The two key terms to remember with regard to wikis are collaboration and audience. Wikis, while certainly not appropriate for every educational situation, provide a very user-friendly method by which to engender collaboration and draw upon the combined strength of a collective group. Wikis can then be shared with an audience, either very focused or broad. As one of our example wikis states:
    In a sense, PsychWiki is owned by the community, with input from anyone with experience and knowledge to share. Some of the pages are more developed than others, but no page is complete. If you feel like you'd like to add something to a particular page, please do so.
    The implications for not only the classroom but also for personal research and professional development are staggering. Wikis, along with other forms of Internet-based communication, make global collaboration and communication not only possible, but feasible for many.
    Consider the following features of wikis:
    Can be used as bare-bones content management systems (CMSs)
    Free of charge
    User-friendly
    Can be text-only or include embedded video, audio, Flash, HTML, and other add-ons
    Opportunity for students to publish to a global audience & contribute a meaningful product for public consumption
    Allows teachers and other educators to maintain open networks for the benefit of all - promotes collaboration and virtual learning
    Here are some tips & tricks for the novice wiki user:
    Bill Ferriter's Teacher Tips for Wiki Projects
    Cybraryman's catalogue of educational wikis
    Also, please see the case study below by Lyndsay Grant:
    {Using Wikis in Schools.PDF}

    Reason For Choosing Scene
    Our group chose this scene because we thought it was important to the rest of the play and it had the perfect requirements and speaking roles for our group. The scene is the begining of the trial for Elizabeth Proctor and company. John goes to try and free his wife and friends from accusations of witch craft. Since our group has five members we needed an act or scene with multiple speaking characters. The scene we picked had eleven roles which is enough for everyone to have a role. A small reason for choosing this act is there are not a lot of sound effects, so everyone in the group can focus more on the speaking roles and making it sound like a true radio broadcast. In the end we chose this scene because it was important to the rest of the play, had enough speaking roles for everyone, and it had little sound effects so everyone could focus more on making the reading sound like a real broadcast of the play The Crucible.
    (view changes)
    7:19 am

Wednesday, August 3

Friday, January 8

  1. user_add Juel Juel joined 304sophs
    9:07 am

Friday, November 6

  1. page Bobby (deleted) edited
    3:13 pm
  2. page space.menu edited ... Fragments & Run-Ons HOME Bobby Sally Damian
    ...
    Fragments & Run-Ons
    HOME
    Bobby
    Sally
    Damian

    (view changes)
    3:12 pm
  3. page Bobby (deleted) edited
    8:16 am
  4. page Bobby (deleted) edited
    8:13 am

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